Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-bjz6k Total loading time: 0.241 Render date: 2022-05-28T07:22:50.637Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Field response of poppies (Papaver somniferum L.) to lime application on acid krasnozems in Tasmania

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

M. G. Temple-Smith
Affiliation:
Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Mt. Pleasant Laboratories, Prospect
D. N. Wright
Affiliation:
Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Mt. Pleasant Laboratories, Prospect
J. C. Laughlin
Affiliation:
Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Mt. Pleasant Laboratories, Prospect
B. J. Hoare
Affiliation:
Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Mt. Pleasant Laboratories, Prospect

Summary

In two field experiments, ground limestone (2·5–20 t/ha), dolomite (4·25 t/ha) and gypsum (3·75 t/ha) were applied to acid krasnozems (Forthside, pH 5·6 and Elliott, pH 5·1), and poppy capsule and morphine yields, leaf nutrient contents and soil chemical properties were measured.

Capsule and morphine yield increased more than two-fold at Forthside as the pH in the surface soil (0–150 mm) increased from 5·6 to 6·1, and by 30-fold at Elliott where the pH increased from 5·1 to 6·0. Capsule morphine concentration was depressed by high rates of ground limestone at both sites but maximum morphine yields of 15·7 kg/ha at Forthside and 11·3 kg/ha at Elliott occurred at the highest rate of ground limestone. Gypsum did not increase yield at Elliott, but at Forthside the gypsum and ground limestone treatment of equivalent calcium content increased yields to the same extent.

The lowest yields at each site were associated with calcium concentration in the leaves at flowering of less than 1% and marginal or high amounts of extractable soil Al at Forthside and Elliott respectively. Concentrations of Ca, P and Mo in leaves were increased by lime applications but leaf concentrations of N, P, Mn, B and Mo on low yielding plots were considered to be in the normal range.

Poppy yield responses to liming were attributed primarily to alleviation of aluminium toxicity but the effects on yield of reductions in soluble Al and increases in available Ca were confounded by application of ground limestone.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ball, D. F. & Williams, W. M. (1968). Variability of soil chemical properties in two uncultivated brown earths. Journal of Soil Science 19, 379391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Colwell, J. D. (1963). The estimation of phosphorus fertiliser requirements of wheat in southern New South Wales by soil analysis. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry 3, 190197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Costes, B., Milhet, Y., Candillon, C. & Magnier, G. (1976). Mineral nutrition and morphine production in Papaver somniferum. Physiologia Plantarum 36, 201207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doss, B. D. & Lund, Z. F. (1975). Subsoil pH effects on growth and yield of cotton. Agronomy Journal 67, 193196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foy, C. D. (1974 a). Effects of aluminium on plant growth. In The Plant Root and its Environment (ed. Carson, E. W.), pp. 601642. University Press of Virginia.Google Scholar
Foy, C. D. (1974 b). Effects of soil calcium availability on plant growth. In The Plant Root and its Environment (ed. Carson, E. W.), pp. 565600. University Press of Virginia.Google Scholar
Foy, C. D., Fleming, A. L. & Armiger, W. H. (1969). Aluminium tolerance of soybean varieties in relation to calcium nutrition. Agronomy Journal 61, 505511.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gericke, S. (1948). Effect of different growth factors on the yield asnd oil content of poppy. Zeitschrift fur Pflanzenernaehrung Duengung, Bodenkunde 40, 1923.Google Scholar
Gonzalez-Erico, E., Kamprath, E. J., Naderman, G. C. & Soares, W. V. (1979). Effect of depth of lime incorporation on the growth of corn on an Oxisol of Central Brazil. Proceedings of the Soil Science Society of America 43, 11551158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Graley, A.M. & Loveday, J. (1961). Chemical and morphological data for soils of the Burnie-Table Cape districts, Tasmania. C.S.I.R.O. Division of Soils, Adelaide, Australia, Divisional Report 13/60.Google Scholar
Hemingway, R. G. (1955). Soil sampling errors and advisory analyses. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 46, 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoyt, P. B. & Nyborg, M. (1971 a). Toxic metals in acid soil. I. Estimation of plant-available aluminium. Proceedings of the Soil Science Society of America 35, 236240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoyt, P. B. & Nyborg, M. (1971 b). Toxic metals in acid soil. II. Estimation of plant-available manganese. Proceedings of the Soil Science Society of America 35, 241244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Isensee, A. R. & Walsh, L. M. (1971). Influence of banded fertiliser on the chemical senvironment surrounding the band. I. Effect on pH and solution nitrogen. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 22, 105109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, C. M. (1966). Molybdenum. In Diagnostic Criteria for Plants and Soils (ed. Chapman, H. D.), pp. 286301. University of California.Google Scholar
Kinoshita, K., Nakagura, Y. & Isaka, H. (1962). Studies on the effects of soil acid upon growth and yield of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.). Bulletin of Japanese National Institute of Hygienic Sciences 80, 158161.Google Scholar
Lamp, C. A. (1965). Manganese toxicity of marrowstemmed kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala D.C.) and its relation to some other plant nutrients. M. Agric. Sci. thesis, University of Melbourne.Google Scholar
Laughlin, J. C. (1980). The boron nutrition of poppies (Papaver somniferum L.) on krasnozems and alluvial soils of Tasmania. Acta Horticulturae 96, 227234.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loveday, J. & Farquhar, R. N. (1958). The soils and some aspects of land use in the Burnie, Table Cape and surrounding districts, North West Tasmania. C.S.I.R.O. Division of Soils, Melbourne, Australia, Soils and Land Use Series no. 26.Google Scholar
Lund, Z. F. (1970). The effect of calcium and its relation to several cations in soybean root growth. Proceedings of the Soil Science Society of America 34, 456459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pleysier, J. L. & Juo, A. S. R. (1980). A single extraction method using silver-thiourea for measuring exchangeable cations and effective CEC in soils with variable charge. Soil Science 29, 205211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pride, R. & Stern, E. S. (1954). A specific method for the determination of morphine. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6, 590606.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Simpson, J. R., Pinkerton, A. & Lazdovskis, J. (1979). Interacting effects of subsoil acidity and water on the root behaviour and shoot growth of some genotypes of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.). Australian Journal of Agricultural Science 30, 609619.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Temple-Smith, M. G. (1982). Comparative response of poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) and eight crop and vegetable species to manganese excess in solution culture. Journal of Plant Nutrition 5, 11531170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wade, C. G. (1961). Manganese toxicity of vegetables with particular reference to cauliflowers. Tasmanian Journal of Agriculture 32, 285287.Google Scholar
11
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Field response of poppies (Papaver somniferum L.) to lime application on acid krasnozems in Tasmania
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Field response of poppies (Papaver somniferum L.) to lime application on acid krasnozems in Tasmania
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Field response of poppies (Papaver somniferum L.) to lime application on acid krasnozems in Tasmania
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *