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Potential, composition and use of legume shrubs and trees as fodders for livestock in the tropics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

J. H. Topps
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, 581 King Street, Aberdeen AB9 IUD, UK

Abstract

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Type
Review
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1992

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References

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