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The use of biplots in interpreting variety by environment interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

R. A. Kempton
Affiliation:
lant Breeding Institute, Trumpington, Cambridge

Summary

Gabriel (1971) proposed a technique for displaying the rows and columns of a twoway table as a two-dimensional biplot so that any element of the table can be approximated by the inner product of vectors corresponding to the appropriate row and column. The technique is useful for investigating the pattern of response of varieties over different environments, and substantially increases the information available from the more familiar methods of regression and principal component analysis without need for additional computation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1984

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