Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

A Branching Process for Virus Survival

  • J. Theodore Cox (a1) and Rinaldo B. Schinazi (a2)
Abstract

Quasispecies theory predicts that there is a critical mutation probability above which a viral population will go extinct. Above this threshold the virus loses the ability to replicate the best-adapted genotype, leading to a population composed of low replicating mutants that is eventually doomed. We propose a new branching model that shows that this is not necessarily so. That is, a population composed of ever changing mutants may survive.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      A Branching Process for Virus Survival
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      A Branching Process for Virus Survival
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      A Branching Process for Virus Survival
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Postal address: Department of Mathematics, Syracuse University, 215 Carnegie Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-1150, USA.
∗∗ Postal address: Department of Mathematics, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80933-7150, USA. Email address: rschinaz@uccs.edu
Footnotes
Hide All

Supported in part by NSF grant 0803517.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
Eigen, M. (1971). Selforganization of matter and the evolution of biological macromolecules. Naturwissenschaften 58, 465523.
Eigen, M. (2002). Error catastrophe and antiviral strategy. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 1337413376.
Eigen, M. and Schuster, P. (1977). The hypercycle. A principle of self-organization. Part A: emergence of the hypercycle. Naturwissenschaften 64, 541565.
Elena, S. F. and Moya, A. (1999). Rate of deleterious mutation and the distribution of its effects on fitness in vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Evol. Biol. 12, 10781088.
Harris, T. E. (1989). The Theory of Branching Processes. Dover Publications, New York.
Karlin, S. and Taylor, H. M. (1975). A First Course in Stochastic Processes, 2nd edn. Academic Press, New York.
Manrubia, S. C., Domingo, E. and Lázaro, E. (2010). Pathways to extinction: beyond the error threshold. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London B 365, 19431943.
Nowak, M. A. and May, R. M. (2000). Virus Dynamics. Oxford University Press.
Sanjuan, R., Moya, A. and Elena, S. F. (2004). The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 83968401.
Schinazi, R. B. and Schweinsberg, J. (2008). Spatial and non spatial stochastic models for immune response. Markov Process. Relat. Fields 14, 255276.
Smith, W. L. and Wilkinson, W. E. (1969). On branching processes in random environments. Ann. Math. Statist. 40, 814827.
Vignuzzi, M. et al. (2006). Quasispecies diversity determines pathogenesis through cooperative interactions in a viral population. Nature 439, 344348
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Journal of Applied Probability
  • ISSN: 0021-9002
  • EISSN: 1475-6072
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-applied-probability
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

MSC classification

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed