Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-8dvf2 Total loading time: 0.372 Render date: 2022-09-29T08:16:53.149Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

The Kota of the Nilgiri hills: a demographic study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Aloke Kumar Ghosh
Affiliation:
Human Biology Section, Anthropological Survey of India, 27, Jawaharlal Nehru Marg, Calcutta-13, India

Extract

A population–biological study of the Kota of the Nilgiri Hills was undertaken between May 1966 and January 1968. This paper discusses the demographic structure of the tribe and its genetic implications.

The Kota is a small tribe of 1203 individuals distributed in only seven villages; it is an isolated population with a low rate of fertility and a high rate of infant mortality. The Kota is not a random mating population. The rate of consanguineous marriages is high and the coefficient of inbreeding is almost equal to the highest recorded value. Besides cousin marriages, marriage within the village is very much preferred. The admixture rate (0·29%) among the Kota is very low. The effective population size is only 28·87% of the total population. The coefficient of breeding isolation is 1·01, which indicates that genetic drift may produce important differentiation in this population. The data show that selection is acting with moderate intensity in this population.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1976, Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Basu, A. (1969) The Pahira: a population genetical study. Am. J. phys. Anthrop. 31, 399.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Basu, A. & Ghosh, A. K. (1968) Hairy ears among the Kota. Bull. cult. Res. Inst. 7, 62.Google Scholar
Bonné, B. (1963) The Samaritans: a demographic study. Hum. Biol. 35, 61.Google ScholarPubMed
Brues, A.M. (1964) Genetic drift in the differentiation of the American indigens: evidence from the blood groups. Sobroctiro del XXXV Congress, International de Americanistas, Mexico, 1962. Actas Mems. Mexico.Google Scholar
Datta, J.M. (1972) Demographic notes on Harappa skeletons. In: Human Skeletal Remains from Harappa. Memoir No. 9, Anthropological Survey of India, Calcutta.Google Scholar
Eaton, J.W. & Mayer, A.J. (1953) The social biology of very high fertility among the Hutterites: the demography of a unique population. Hum. Biol. 25, 206.Google ScholarPubMed
Ghosh, A.K. (1970) Selection intensity in the Kota of Nilgiri Hills, Madras. Soc. Biol. 17, 224.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ghosh, A.K. (1972a) A note on nail-patella syndrome and palmaris longus muscle. East. Anthrop. 25, 183.Google Scholar
Ghosh, A.K. (1972b) Inbreeding in the Kota of Nilgiri Hills, Madras. Soc. Biol. 19, 289.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ghosh, A.K. (1973) ABO blood groups and PTC taste sensitivity among the Kota of Nilgiri Hills. Hum. Hered. 23, 78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnston, F.E., Kensinger, K. M., Jantz, R. L. & Walker, G. F. (1969) The population structure of the Peruvian Cashinahua: demographic, genetic and cultural interrelationships. Hum. Biol. 41, 29.Google ScholarPubMed
Keith, A. (1950) A New Theory of Human Evolution. Watts, London.Google Scholar
Lasker, G.W. (1952) Mixture and genetic drift in ongoing human evolution. Am. Anthrop. 54, 433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lasker, G.W. & Kaplan, B. A. (1964) The co–efficient of breeding isolation: population size, migration rates and the possibilities for random genetic drift in six human communities in Northern Peru. Hum. Biol. 36, 327.Google Scholar
Neel, J.V. (1967) The genetic structure of primitive human populations. Jap. J. hum. Genet. 12, 1.Google Scholar
Roberts, D.F. (1956) A demographic study of a Dinka village. Hum. Biol. 28, 323.Google ScholarPubMed
Salzano, F.M. (1961) Studies on the Caingang Indians I. Demography. Hum. Biol. 33, 110.Google ScholarPubMed
Salzano, F.M., Neel, J. V. & Maybury-Lewis, D. (1967) Further studies on the Xavante Indians: 1. Demographic data on two additional villages: genetic structure of the tribe. Am. J. hum. Genet. 19, 436.Google Scholar
Verghese, I. (1966) The Kota: their dreaded life of Kurumba sorcery. Bull. cult. Res. Inst. 5, 98.Google Scholar
WHO (1964) Research in population genetics of primitive groups. WHO Tech. Rep. Ser. No. 279.Google Scholar
Wright, S. (1938) Size of population and breeding structure in relation to evolution. Science, N. Y. 87, 430.Google Scholar
Wright, S. (1940) Breeding structure of populations in relation to speciation. Am. Nat. 74, 232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Kota of the Nilgiri hills: a demographic study
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Kota of the Nilgiri hills: a demographic study
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Kota of the Nilgiri hills: a demographic study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *