Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-frvt8 Total loading time: 0.487 Render date: 2022-09-28T14:25:56.642Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

The benefit of orthographic support for oral vocabulary learning in children with Down syndrome*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2012

SILVANA E. MENGONI*
Affiliation:
The Open University, UK
HANNAH NASH
Affiliation:
University of York, UK
CHARLES HULME
Affiliation:
University of York, UK
*
Address for correspondence: Silvana E. Mengoni, Faculty of Education and Language Studies, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA. e-mail:silvana.mengoni@open.ac.uk.

Abstract

Children with Down syndrome typically have weaknesses in oral language, but it has been suggested that this domain may benefit from learning to read. Amongst oral language skills, vocabulary is a relative strength, although there is some evidence of difficulties in learning the phonological form of spoken words. This study investigated the effect of orthographic support on spoken word learning with seventeen children with Down syndrome aged seven to sixteen years and twenty-seven typically developing children aged five to seven years matched for reading ability. Ten spoken nonwords were paired with novel pictures; for half the nonwords the written form was also present. The spoken word learning of both groups did not differ and benefited to the same extent from the presence of the written word. This suggests that compared to reading-matched typically developing children, children with Down syndrome are not specifically impaired in phonological learning and benefit equally from orthographic support.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

[*]

The support of a CASE PhD studentship from the ESRC and Down Syndrome Education International is gratefully acknowledged. The authors wish to thank the children, families, and schools who took part in this project.

References

REFERENCES

Abbeduto, L., Warren, S. F. & Conners, F. A. (2007). Language development in Down syndrome: From the prelinguistic period to the acquisition of literacy. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews 13(3), 247–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bird, G., Alton, S. & Mackinnon, C. (2000). Accessing the curriculum–Strategies for differentiation for pupils with Down syndrome. Available at: http://www.down-syndrome.org/information/education/curriculum/Google Scholar
Boudreau, D. M. (2002). Literacy skills in children and adolescents with Down syndrome. Reading and Writing 15(5–6), 497525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buckley, S. (1993). Developing the speech and language skills of teenagers with Down's syndrome. Down Syndrome Research & Practice 1(2), 6371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buckley, S. (1995). Teaching children with Down syndrome to read and write. In Nadel, L. & Rosenthal, D. (eds), Down syndrome: Living and learning in the community, 158–69. New York: Wiley-Liss, Inc.Google Scholar
Buckley, S., Bird, G., Sacks, B. & Archer, T. (2006). A comparison of mainstream and special education for teenagers with Down syndrome: Implications for parents and teachers. Down Syndrome Research & Practice 9(3), 5467.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carey, S. & Bartlett, E. (1978). Acquiring a single new word. Papers and Reports on Child Language Development 15, 1729.Google Scholar
Carroll, J. M. (2004). Letter knowledge precipitates phoneme segmentation, but not phoneme invariance. Journal of Research in Reading 27(3), 212–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chapman, R. S. & Hesketh, L. J. (2000). Behavioural phentoype of individuals with Down syndrome. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews 6, 8495.3.0.CO;2-P>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chapman, R. S., Kay-Raining Bird, E. & Schwartz, S. (1990). Fast mapping of words in event contexts by children with Down syndrome. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders 55, 761–70.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chapman, R. S., Seung, H. K., Schwartz, S. E. & Kay-Raining Bird, E. (1998). Language skills of children and adolescents with Down syndrome: II. Production deficits. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research 41(4), 861–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Graaf, E. A. B. (1993). Learning to read at an early age. Case study of a Dutch boy. Down Syndrome Research & Practice 1(2), 8790.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dodd, B., Holm, A., Hua, Z. & Crosbie, S. (2003). Phonological development: A normative study of British English-speaking children. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 17(8), 617–43.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Duffen, L. (1976). Teaching reading to teach language. Remedial Education 11(3), 139–42.Google Scholar
Ehri, L. C. & Wilce, L. S. (1979). The mnemonic value of orthography among beginning readers. Journal of Educational Psychology 71(1), 2640.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fidler, D. J., Hepburn, S. L. & Rogers, S. (2006). Early learning and adaptive behaviour in toddlers with Down syndrome: Evidence for an emerging behavioural phenotype? Down Syndrome Research & Practice 9(3), 3744.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hulme, C., Stothard, S. E., Clarke, P. J., Bowyer-Crane, C., Harrington, A., Truelove, E. & Snowling, M. J. (2009). York Assessment of Reading for Comprehension: Early Reading. London: GL Assessment.Google Scholar
Jarrold, C., Baddeley, A. D. & Hewes, A. K. (1999). Genetically dissociated components of working memory: Evidence from Downs and Williams syndrome. Neuropsychologia 37, 637–51.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jarrold, C., Thorn, A. S. C. & Stephens, E. (2009). The relationships between verbal short-term memory, phonological awareness, and new word learning: Evidence from typical development and Down syndrome. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 102, 196218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kay-Raining Bird, E., Chapman, R. S. & Schwartz, S. (2004). Fast mapping of words and story recall by individuals with Down syndrome. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 47, 1286–300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kay-Raining Bird, E., Gaskell, A., Dallaire, M. B. & MacDonald, S. (2000). Novel word acquisition in children with Down syndrome: Does modality made a difference? Journal of Communication Disorders 33, 241–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kumin, L., Councill, C. & Goodman, M. (1994). A longitudinal study of the emergence of phonemes in children with Down syndrome. Journal of Communication Disorders 27, 293303.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laws, G. & Bishop, D. V. M. (2003). The comparison of language abilities in adolescents with Down syndrome and children with specific language impairment. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 46(6), 1324–39.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laws, G., Buckley, S., Bird, G., MacDonald, J. & Broadley, I. (1995). The influence of reading instruction on language and memory development in children with Down syndrome. Down Syndrome Research & Practice 3(2), 5964.Google Scholar
Laws, G. & Gunn, D. (2002). Relationships between reading, phonological skills and language development in individuals with Down syndrome: A five year follow-up study. Reading and Writing 15, 527–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Määttä, T., Tervo-Määttä, T., Taanila, A., Kaski, M. & Livanainen, M. (2006). Mental health, behaviour and intellectual abilities of people with Down syndrome. Down Syndrome Research & Practice 11(1), 3743.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McDuffie, A. S., Sindberg, H., Hesketh, L. J. & Chapman, R. S. (2007). Use of speaker intent and grammatical cues in fast-mapping by adolescents with Down syndrome. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 50, 1546–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morris, J. K. & Alberman, E. (2009). Trends in Down's syndrome live births and antenatal diagnoses in England and Wales from 1989 to 2008: Analysis of data from the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register. British Medical Journal 339, b3794b3794.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mosse, E. K. & Jarrold, C. (2011). Evidence for preserved novel word learning in Down syndrome suggests multiple routes to vocabulary acquisition. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 54, 1137–52.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Næss, K-A. B., Lyster, S-A. H., Hulme, C. & Melby-Lervåg, M. (2011). Language and verbal short-term memory skills in children with Down syndrome: A meta-analytic review. Research in Developmental Disabilities 32(6), 2225–34.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nash, H. M. & Heath, J. (2011). The role of vocabulary, working memory and inference making ability in reading comprehension in Down syndrome. Research of Developmental Disabilities 32(5), 1782–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perfetti, C. A. & Hart, L. (2002). The lexical quality hypothesis. In Verhoeven, L. T., Elbro, C. & Reitsma, P. (eds), Precursors of functional literacy, 189213. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pickering, S. & Gathercole, S. (2001). Working Memory Test Battery for Children. London: Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
Price, J., Roberts, J., Vandergrift, N. & Martin, G. (2007). Language comprehension in boys with Fragile X syndrome and boys with Down syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 51(4), 318–26.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ricketts, J., Bishop, D. V. M. & Nation, K. (2009). Orthographic facilitation in oral vocabulary acquisition. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 62(10), 1948–66.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roberts, J., Steven, L. H., Malkin, C., Barnes, E., Skinner, M., Hennon, E. A. & Anderson, K. (2005). A comparison of phonological skills of boys with Fragile X syndrome and Down syndrome. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research 48(5), 980–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roch, M. & Jarrold, C. (2008). A comparison between word and nonword reading in Down syndrome: The role of phonological awareness. Journal of Communication Disorders 41(4), 305318.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rosenthal, J. & Ehri, L. C. (2008). The mnemonic value of orthography for vocabulary learning. Journal of Educational Psychology 100(1), 175–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snowling, M. J., Stothard, S. E., Clarke, P. J., Bowyer-Crane, C., Harrington, A., Truelove, E., Nation, K. & Hulme, C. (2009). York Assessment of Reading for Comprehension: Passage Reading. London: GL Assessment.Google Scholar
Treiman, R. & Bourassa, D. (2000). Children's written and oral spelling. Applied Psycholinguistics 21(02), 183204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wechsler, D. (1999). Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. San Antonio, TX: Harcourt Assessment Inc.Google Scholar
Wechsler, D. (2003). Wechsler Pre-School and Primary Scale of Intelligence IIIUK. Oxford: Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
23
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The benefit of orthographic support for oral vocabulary learning in children with Down syndrome*
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The benefit of orthographic support for oral vocabulary learning in children with Down syndrome*
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The benefit of orthographic support for oral vocabulary learning in children with Down syndrome*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *