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Exposure to Foreign Languages through Live Interaction Can Facilitate Children’s Acceptance of Multiple Labeling Conventions across Languages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2022

Hyuna LEE
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Education, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea
Hyun-joo SONG*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea
*
*Corresponding author: Dr. Hyun-joo Song, Department of Psychology, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea. Email: hsong@yonsei.ac.kr

Abstract

The current research examined whether children’s expectations about labeling conventions can be influenced by limited exposure to a foreign language. Three- to four-year-old Korean children were presented with two speakers who each assigned a novel label either in Korean or Spanish to a novel object. Children were asked whether both labels were acceptable for the object. Children who had more exposure to a foreign language through live social interaction, but not through media, were more likely to accept both Korean and Spanish labels. These findings indicate the influence of social interaction in foreign language exposure on children’s understanding of different labeling conventions.

Type
Brief Research Report
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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