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Input and uptake at 7 months predicts toddler vocabulary: the role of child-directed speech and infant processing skills in language development

  • ROCHELLE S. NEWMAN (a1), MEREDITH L. ROWE (a2) and NAN BERNSTEIN RATNER (a1)
Abstract

Both the input directed to the child, and the child's ability to process that input, are likely to impact the child's language acquisition. We explore how these factors inter-relate by tracking the relationships among: (a) lexical properties of maternal child-directed speech to prelinguistic (7-month-old) infants (N = 121); (b) these infants' abilities to segment lexical targets from conversational child-directed utterances in an experimental paradigm; and (c) the children's vocabulary outcomes at age 2;0. Both repetitiveness in maternal input and the child's speech segmentation skills at age 0;7 predicted language outcomes at 2;0; moreover, while these factors were somewhat inter-related, they each had independent effects on toddler vocabulary skill, and there was no interaction between the two.

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Corresponding author
[*] Address for correspondence: University of Maryland – Hearing and Speech, 0100 Lefrak Hall, College Park Maryland 20742, United States. e-mail: rnewman1@umd.edu
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Journal of Child Language
  • ISSN: 0305-0009
  • EISSN: 1469-7602
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-child-language
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