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Introducing the Infant Bookreading Database (IBDb)*

  • CARLA L. HUDSON KAM (a1) and LISA MATTHEWSON (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

Studies on the relationship between bookreading and language development typically lack data about which books are actually read to children. This paper reports on an Internet survey designed to address this data gap. The resulting dataset (the Infant Bookreading Database or IBDb) includes responses from 1,107 caregivers of children aged 0–36 months who answered questions about the English-language books they most commonly read to their children. The inclusion of demographic information enables analysis of subsets of data based on age, sex, or caregivers’ education level. A comparison between our dataset and those used in previous analyses reveals that there is relatively little overlap between booklists gathered from proxies such as bestseller lists and the books caregivers reported reading to children in our survey. The IBDb is available for download for use by researchers at <http://linguistics.ubc.ca/ubc-ibdb/>.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Carla L. Hudson Kam, Department of Linguistics, 2613 West Mall, The University of British Columbia, V6 T 1Z4. e-mail: Carla.HudsonKam@ubc.ca
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[*]

This research was supported in part by a grant from the UBC Office of the Vice-President Research and International SSHRC Reapplication Assistance Fund. We thank Macaela MacWilliams and Alannah Turner for their assistance in compiling and cleaning the dataset.

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References
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Journal of Child Language
  • ISSN: 0305-0009
  • EISSN: 1469-7602
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-child-language
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