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482 Evaluating the Effects and Contributing Factors to the “Hidden Curriculum” in Medical School

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 April 2022

C. Yoonhee Ryder
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
Sanaya Irani
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
Patti Andreski
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
Karri Grob
Affiliation:
University of Michigan
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: The “hidden curriculum” is a set of unofficial rules outside of the formal curriculum that allows medical students to succeed. It is often not accessible to those who are first-generation in medicine. This study created a novel survey tool to directly evaluate the hidden curriculum, its contributing factors, and its effects on students. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Using available literature as a guide, a novel survey tool to evaluate different aspects of the hidden curriculum was created. This survey consists of 17 Likert scale questions on topics varying from sense of belongingness to dress code, self-guided studying, mentorship, and confidence in knowing how to succeed. This survey tool was embedded into a larger survey evaluating health disparities and diversity, inclusion, accessibility, and justice (DEIAJ) in the curricular and extracurricular spaces. This survey packet was administered to all medical students at a large U.S. medical school. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: 166 medical students from all years responded to this survey. 70% were female, 27% male, and 3% non-binary or prefer not to say. 67% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that there is a hidden curriculum accessible to only those who have family members in medicine. 57% agreed or strongly agreed that the medical school gave them the adequate training and resources to succeed. 48% agreed or strongly agreed that they would perform better academically if they had more money with 11% stating they often feel embarrassed in a professional setting due to lack of money. Fellow classmen, faculty members, and upperclassmen were identified as the most useful resources to learn how to succeed in medical school. Students on average reported feeling like they knew what to do to succeed in medical school half of the time. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This data strongly supports the existence of a hidden curriculum and gives insight into the importance of financial support for low-income students and peer support groups for those who do not have family members in medicine. This data will be used to inform future interventions to address the hidden curriculum.

Type
Workforce Development
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. The Association for Clinical and Translational Science