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Effect of a Clinical and Translational Science Award institute on grant funding in a major research university

  • Felichism W. Kabo (a1) and George A. Mashour (a2) (a3)

Abstract

Introduction

Previous studies have examined the impact of Clinical and Translational Science Awards programs on other outcomes, but not on grant seeking. The authors examined the effects on grant seeking of the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR), a Clinical and Translational Science Awards institute at the University of Michigan.

Methods

We assessed over 63,000 grant proposals submitted at the University of Michigan in the years 2002–2012 using data from the university and MICHR’s Tracking Metrics and Reporting System. We used a retrospective, observational study of the dynamics of grant-seeking success and award funding. Heckman selection models were run to assess MICHR’s relationship with a proposal’s success (selection), and subsequently the award’s size (outcome). Models were run for all proposals and for clinical and translational research (CTR) proposals alone. Other covariates included proposal classification, type of grant award, academic unit, and year.

Results

MICHR had a positive and statistically significant relationship with success for both proposal types. For all grants, MICHR was associated with a 29.6% increase in award size. For CTR grants, MICHR had a statistically nonsignificant relationship with award size.

Conclusions

MICHR’s infrastructure, created to enable and enhance CTR, has also created positive spillovers for a broader spectrum of research and grant seeking.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: F. W. Kabo, M.Arch., M.S., Ph.D., Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, 3336 ISR, 426 Thompson Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1248, USA. (Email: fkabo@umich.edu)

References

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Effect of a Clinical and Translational Science Award institute on grant funding in a major research university

  • Felichism W. Kabo (a1) and George A. Mashour (a2) (a3)

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