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Effectiveness of community outreach and engagement in recruitment success for a prebirth cohort

  • Beth B. Tigges (a1), Jill L. Kaar (a2), Nancy Erbstein (a3), Pamela Silberman (a4), Kate Winseck (a5), Maria Lopez-Class (a6) and Thomas M. Burbacher (a7)...
Abstract
Introduction

We describe the effectiveness of community outreach and engagement in supporting recruitment for the US National Children’s Vanguard Study between 2009 and 2012.

Methods

Thirty-seven study locations used 1 of 4 strategies to recruit 18–49-year-old pregnant or trying to conceive women: (1) Initial Vanguard Study used household-based recruitment; (2) Direct Outreach emphasized self-referral; (3) Enhanced Household-Based Recruitment enhanced Initial Vanguard Study strategies; and (4) Provider-Based Recruitment recruited through healthcare providers. Outreach and engagement included advance letters, interactions with healthcare providers, participation in community events, contacts with community organizations, and media outreach.

Results

After 1–2 years, 41%–74% of 9844 study-eligible women had heard about the National Children’s Vanguard Study when first approached. Women who heard were 1.5–3 times more likely to consent. Hearing via word-of-mouth or the media most frequently predicted consent. The more sources women heard from the higher the odds of consent.

Conclusions

We conclude that tailored outreach and engagement facilitate recruitment in cohort studies.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: B. B. Tigges, MSC07 4380, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. (Email: btigges@salud.unm.edu)
References
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