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Evolution of a functional taxonomy of career pathways for biomedical trainees

  • Ambika Mathur (a1), Patrick Brandt (a2), Roger Chalkley (a3), Laura Daniel (a4), Patricia Labosky (a5), Constance Stayart (a6) and Frederick J. Meyers (a7)...
Abstract

Several reports have shown that doctoral and postdoctoral trainees in biomedical research pursue diverse careers that advance science meaningful to society. Several groups have proposed 3-tier career taxonomy to showcase these outcomes. This 3-tier taxonomy will be a valuable resource for institutions committed to greater transparency in reporting outcomes, to not only be transparent in reporting their own institutional data but also to lend greater power to a central repository.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: Frederick J. Meyers, Professor of Internal Medicine, Associate Dean for Precision Medicine, University of California Davis School of Medicine, 2450, 48th Street Suite 2800, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. (Email: fjmeyers@ucdavis.edu)
References
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Journal of Clinical and Translational Science
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2059-8661
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-clinical-and-translational-science
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