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Towards a practical model for community engagement: Advancing the art and science in academic health centers

  • Syed M. Ahmed (a1) (a2), Sharon Neu Young (a1), Mia C. DeFino (a3), Zeno Franco (a2) and David A. Nelson (a2)...
Abstract
Introduction

Community engagement (CE) has become more prevalent among academic health centers (AHCs), with significant diversity in practices and language. The array of approaches to CE contributes to confusion among practitioners.

Methods

We have reviewed multiple models of CE utilized by AHCs, Clinical and Translational Science Awards, and higher education institutions overall. Taking these models into consideration, we propose a comprehensive model of CE that encompasses a broader spectrum of activities and programs.

Results

The CE Components Practical Model includes 5 components: Community Outreach and Service, Education, Clinical Care, Research, and Policy and Advocacy. The components are supported by the foundational elements within administrative functions and infrastructure.

Conclusions

This model will accomplish the following: (1) reduce confusion about CE; (2) provide a broader understanding of CE; and (3) increase the ability of CE practitioners to interact with each other through this common reference and engage in advancing CE scholarship.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: S. M. Ahmed, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Suite H2500, PO Box 26509, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. (Email: sahmed@mcw.edu)
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