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Characterization of the lactic acid bacteria in artisanal dairy products

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 1997

TIMOTHY M. COGAN
Affiliation:
National Dairy Products Research Centre, Teagasc, Fermoy, Irish Republic
MANUELA BARBOSA
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Azinhaga dos Lameiros, P-1699 Lisbon, Portugal
ERIC BEUVIER
Affiliation:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Station de Recherches en Technologie et Analyses Laitières, BP 89, F-39801 Poligny, France
BRUNA BIANCHI-SALVADORI
Affiliation:
Centro Sperimentale del Latte, Strada per Merlino 3, I-20060 Zelo Buon Persico (Mi), Italia
PIER S. COCCONCELLI
Affiliation:
Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via Emilia Parmense, 84, I-29100 Piacenza, Italia
ISABEL FERNANDES
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Azinhaga dos Lameiros, P-1699 Lisbon, Portugal
JESUS GOMEZ
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraría y Alimentaria, Apartado 8111, E-28080 Madrid, España
ROSARIO GOMEZ
Affiliation:
Instituto del Frio, Ciudad Universitaria, E-28040 Madrid, España
GEORGE KALANTZOPOULOS
Affiliation:
Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 118 55 Athens, Greece
ANTONIO LEDDA
Affiliation:
Istituto Zootecnico Caseario per la Sardegna, I-07040 Olmedo (Sassari), Sardinia, Italia
MARGARITA MEDINA
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraría y Alimentaria, Apartado 8111, E-28080 Madrid, España
MARY C. REA
Affiliation:
National Dairy Products Research Centre, Teagasc, Fermoy, Irish Republic
EVA RODRIGUEZ
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraría y Alimentaria, Apartado 8111, E-28080 Madrid, España

Abstract

In all, 4379 isolates from 35 products, including 24 artisanal cheeses, were surveyed with a view to identifying strains that could be used as starters in commercial dairy fermentations. Of the isolates, 38% were classified as Lactococcus, 17% as Enterococcus, 14% as Streptococcus thermophilus, 12% as mesophilic Lactobacillus, 10% as Leuconostoc and 9% as thermophilic Lactobacillus. Acid production by the isolates varied considerably. Of the 1582 isolates of Lactococcus and 482 isolates of mesophilic Lactobacillus tested, only 8 and 2% respectively produced sufficient acid to lower the pH of milk to <5·3 in 6 h at 30°C. In contrast, 53, 32 and 13% of Str. thermophilus, thermophilic Lactobacillus and Enterococcus isolates respectively reduced the pH to 5·3. These isolates were found only in some French, Italian and Greek cheeses. Bacteriocins were produced by 11% of the 2257 isolates tested and 26 of them produced broad-spectrum bacteriocins which inhibited at least eight of the ten target strains used, which included lactic acid bacteria, clostridia and Listeria innocua. The most proteolytic of the 2469 isolates tested were Str. thermophilus from Fontina cheese followed by Enterococcus from Fiore Sardo and Toma cheese and thermophilic Lactobacillus from all sources. Exopolysaccharides were produced by 5·3% of the 2224 isolates tested.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1997

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