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Comparative study of microbiological, chemical and sensory properties of kefirs produced in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2016

Dea Anton*
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia Bio-competence Centre of Healthy Dairy Products, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Piret Raudsepp
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia Bio-competence Centre of Healthy Dairy Products, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Mati Roasto
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Kadrin Meremäe
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Sirje Kuusik
Affiliation:
Bio-competence Centre of Healthy Dairy Products, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51014 Tartu, Estonia Department of Animal Nutrition, Laboratory of Milk Quality Research, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 48, 51006, Tartu, Estonia
Peeter Toomik
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Priit Elias
Affiliation:
Bio-competence Centre of Healthy Dairy Products, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51014 Tartu, Estonia Department of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/5, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Katrin Laikoja
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia Department of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/5, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Tanel Kaart
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 62, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
Martin Lepiku
Affiliation:
Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia
Tõnu Püssa
Affiliation:
Department of Food Hygiene, Institute of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56/3, 51014 Tartu, Estonia Bio-competence Centre of Healthy Dairy Products, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51014 Tartu, Estonia
*
*For correspondence; e-mail: dea.anton@emu.ee

Abstract

In the current study the microbiological, sensory and chemical properties of 24 kefirs (12 producers) from Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian retail market were determined using gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-MS/MS-Q-TOF and LC-ion trap MS/MS), spectrophotometry and other methods. Antihypertensive, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting, antioxidant and antibacterial peptides were found in the kefir samples. According to the results of principal component analysis of 200 most abundant compounds obtained with HPLC-MS/MS-Q-TOF analysis, Estonian kefirs differed from the rest. Kefirs of Latvian and Lithuanian origin showed similarities in several characteristics, probably related to the starter cultures and technological processes. The fatty acids composition of all Baltic kefirs was uniform. The antioxidant capacity of the kefirs varied slightly, whereas intermediate positive correlation (r = 0·32, P < 0·05) was found between antioxidativity and total bacterial count. The lipid oxidation level, estimated as the content of linoleic and oleic acid primary oxidation products, oxylipins, was very low in all studied kefirs. Only one third of analysed kefirs met the requirements of the minimum sum of viable microorganisms, indicated in the Codex Standard for Fermented Milks.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2016 

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