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Oxytocin release and lactation performance in Syrian Shami cattle milked with and without suckling

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2005

Shehadeh H Kaskous
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Damascus University, PO Box: 30621, Damascus, Syria
Daniel Weiss
Affiliation:
Physiology Weihenstephan, Technical University Munich, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, D-85350, Freising, Germany
Yassin Massri
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Damascus University, PO Box: 30621, Damascus, Syria General Commission for Scientific Agricultural Research, Animal Wealth Research Administration, PO Box: 5391 Damascus, Syria
Al-Moutassem B Al-Daker
Affiliation:
General Commission for Scientific Agricultural Research, Animal Wealth Research Administration, PO Box: 5391 Damascus, Syria
Ab-Dallah Nouh
Affiliation:
General Commission for Scientific Agricultural Research, Animal Wealth Research Administration, PO Box: 5391 Damascus, Syria
Rupert M Bruckmaier
Affiliation:
Physiology Weihenstephan, Technical University Munich, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, D-85350, Freising, Germany

Abstract

Oxytocin (OT) release and lactation performance in primiparous Syrian Shami cows were evaluated in response to two different machine milking regimes. Six cows were milked in the presence of the calves (PC) and subsequently suckled, whereas six cows were exclusively machine milked without the presence of their calves (WC) until day 91 post partum. Milk yield and milk constituents were determined weekly. The degree of udder evacuation was determined by the succeeding removal of residual milk. PC released OT during the milking process, whereas in WC no OT release was detected throughout the milking process. Consequently, the residual milk fraction was much lower in PC than in WC (11% v. 58%, P<0·05) and daily milk yield until day 91 post partum was higher in PC than in WC (12·6±0·3 v. 7·1±0·4 kg, P<0·05). In conclusion, Syrian Shami cattle are not suitable to be exclusively machine milked without the presence of their calves.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2005

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