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MEASUREMENT WITHOUT THEORY, ONCE AGAIN

  • Jeremy Greenwood (a1), Ananth Seshadri (a2) and Guillaume Vandenbroucke (a3)
Abstract:

Bailey and Collins (2011) argue that Greenwood, Seshadri, and Vandenbroucke’s (2005) hypothesis that the baby boom was partly due to a burst of productivity in the household sector is not supported by evidence. This conclusion is based on regression results showing that appliance ownership is negatively correlated with fertility. They also argue that the Amish, who limit the use of modern technology, had a baby boom. First, it is demonstrated that a negative correlation between appliance ownership and fertility can arise naturally in Greenwood, Seshadri, and Vandenbroucke’s model. Second, evidence is presented casting doubt on the presumed technology phobia of the Amish.

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References
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Journal of Demographic Economics
  • ISSN: 2054-0892
  • EISSN: 2054-0906
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-demographic-economics
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