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Time to cut the cord: recognizing and addressing the imbalance of DOHaD research towards the study of maternal pregnancy exposures

  • G. C. Sharp (a1), L. Schellhas (a2), S. S. Richardson (a3) and D. A. Lawlor (a4)
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.
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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: G. C. Sharp, MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol and Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. E-mail: gemma.sharp@bristol.ac.uk

References

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2.Kiernan, K. Fathers and Partners in National and International Birth Cohort Studies, 2014.
3.Wright, J, Small, N, Raynor, P, et al. Cohort profile: The Born in Bradford multi-ethnic family cohort study. Int J Epidemiol. 2013; 42, 978991.
4.Tyrrell, J, Huikari, V, Christie, JT, et al. Genetic variation in the 15q25 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene cluster (CHRNA5–CHRNA3–CHRNB4) interacts with maternal self-reported smoking status during pregnancy to influence birth weight. Hum Mol Genet. 2012; 21, 53445358.
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Time to cut the cord: recognizing and addressing the imbalance of DOHaD research towards the study of maternal pregnancy exposures

  • G. C. Sharp (a1), L. Schellhas (a2), S. S. Richardson (a3) and D. A. Lawlor (a4)
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.

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