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Passage of Eggs by Hosts Infected with Schistosoma haematobium*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2009

Robert E. Kuntz
Affiliation:
Parasitology Department, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No.2, Taipei, Taiwan (Formosa) and NAMRU-3, Cairo, Egypt (UAR)

Extract

Study of a series of lower vertebrates and 2 primates infected with Schistosoma haematobium has revealed their egg producing or egg passing potentials. Viable eggs were not passed by albino or wild rats (R. rattus), or by hedgehogs (Hemiechinus). In hosts passing eggs the counts were not great but data do suggest host-parasite relationships which permit continuance of the parasite cycle. Egg passage was erratic and tended to follow a normal curve, i.e., few eggs at first, building up to a peak period after which the counts usually diminished. There was no close correlation between the sites of egg deposition along the intestinal tract and the numbers of egg produced. The peak of egg production was irregular in time after first egg detection as well as in duration. There was wide range in the percentages of viable eggs passed by different hosts and by individuals of the same species. Data reveal the possibility of lower vertebrates serving as reservoirs should satisfactory circumstances allow.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1961

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References

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