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Paradoxical vocal cord motion: an unusual cause of stridor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 June 2007

Abstract

Stridor due to obstructive causes is relatively common. Functional airway obstruction with paradoxical vocal cord motion is uncommon. Only 12 cases have been reported in the literature in the past 15 years. The majority were young female patients. We have recently encountered two cases. Lack of awareness of this condition caused several problems in management.

Type
Clinical Records
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 1991

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References

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