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Peak and ceiling effects in final-product analysis of mastoidectomy performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2015

N West
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark
L Konge
Affiliation:
Center for Clinical Education, Centre for HR, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark
P Cayé-Thomasen
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark
M S Sørensen
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark
S A W Andersen
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark
Corresponding
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Abstract

Background:

Virtual reality surgical simulation of mastoidectomy is a promising training tool for novices. Final-product analysis for assessing novice mastoidectomy performance could be limited by a peak or ceiling effect. These may be countered by simulator-integrated tutoring.

Methods:

Twenty-two participants completed a single session of self-directed practice of the mastoidectomy procedure in a virtual reality simulator. Participants were randomised for additional simulator-integrated tutoring. Performances were assessed at 10-minute intervals using final-product analysis.

Results:

In all, 45.5 per cent of participants peaked before the 60-minute time limit. None of the participants achieved the maximum score, suggesting a ceiling effect. The tutored group performed better than the non-tutored group but tutoring did not eliminate the peak or ceiling effects.

Conclusion:

Timing and adequate instruction is important when using final-product analysis to assess novice mastoidectomy performance. Improved real-time feedback and tutoring could address the limitations of final product based assessment.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2015 

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