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Retrospective survey of long-term results and patient satisfaction with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty for snoring

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2006

L. A. Hicklin
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey, UK.
P. Tostevin
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey, UK.
S. Dasan
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to retrospectively survey patients who had undergone the uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) operation over a two-year period, assessing loudness of snoring, sleep quality and patient satisfaction. A total of 271 patients were sent questionnaires to assess snoring and sleeping habits, with additional questions about pain and satisfaction with surgery. Those who did not reply were contacted by telephone. Seventy-four per cent of the target population were surveyed. Taking an improvement in snoring level of 50 per cent or greater, immediately post-operatively the overall success rate was 76 per cent; however, after two years the success rate fell to 45 per cent. Variables such as alcohol consumption and smoking were not found to influence results. On a post-operative pain scale of 1–10 the average was 7.5 and on a satisfaction scale of 1–10 the average satisfaction with surgery was five, 61 per cent of patients stating that they would not have this operation again. This study shows that the UPPP operation is successful in only 45 per cent of patients after long-term follow-up, that the majority of patients experience severe pain and that the overall satisfaction with surgery is low.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Royal Society of Medicine Press Limited 2000

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