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Laryngeal cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary guidelines

  • T M Jones (a1), M De (a2), B Foran (a3), K Harrington (a4) and S Mortimore (a2)...
Abstract
Abstract

This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. Significantly new data have been published on laryngeal cancer management since the last edition of the guidelines. This paper discusses the evidence base pertaining to the management of laryngeal cancer and provides updated recommendations on management for this group of patients receiving cancer care.

Recommendations

• Radiotherapy (RT) and transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) are accepted treatment options for T1a–T2a glottic carcinoma. (R)

• Open partial surgery may have a role in the management of selected tumours. (R)

• Radiotherapy, TLM and transoral robotic surgery are reasonable treatment options for T1–T2 supraglottic carcinoma. (R)

• Supraglottic laryngectomy may have a role in the management of selected tumours. (R)

• Most patients with T2b–T3 glottic cancers are suitable for non-surgical larynx preservation therapies. (R)

• Concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be regarded as the standard of care for non-surgical management. (R)

• Subject to the availability of appropriate surgical expertise and multi-disciplinary rehabilitation services, TLM or open partial surgical procedures ± post-operative RT, may be also be appropriate in selected cases. (R)

• In the absence of clinical or radiological evidence of nodal disease, elective treatment (RT or surgery ± post-operative RT) is recommended to at least lymph node levels II, III and IV bilaterally. In node positive disease, it is recommended that lymph node levels II–V should be treated on the involved side. If level II nodes are involved, then elective irradiation of ipsilateral level Ib nodes may be considered. (R)

• Most patients with T3 supraglottic cancers are suitable for non-surgical larynx preservation therapies. (R)

• Concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be regarded as the standard of care for non-surgical management. (R)

• Subject to the availability of appropriate surgical expertise and multi-disciplinary rehabilitation services, TLM or open partial surgical procedures ± post-operative RT, may also be appropriate in selected cases. (R)

• In the absence of clinical or radiological evidence of nodal disease, elective treatment (RT or surgery ± post-operative RT) is recommended to at least lymph node levels II, III and IV bilaterally. In node positive disease, lymph node levels II–V should be treated on the involved side. (R)

• As per the PET-Neck clinical trial, patients with N2 or N3 neck disease who undergo treatment with chemoradiotherapy to their laryngeal primary and experience a complete response with a subsequent negative post-treatment positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET–CT) scan do not require an elective neck dissection. In contrast, patients who have a partial response to treatment or have increased uptake on a post-treatment PET–CT scan should have a neck dissection. (R)

• Larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be considered for T4 tumours, unless there is tumour invasion through cartilage into the soft tissues of the neck, in which case total laryngectomy yields better outcomes. (R)

• In the absence of clinical or radiological evidence of nodal disease, elective treatment (RT or surgery ± post-operative RT) is recommended to bilateral lymph node levels II, III, IV, V and VI. (R)

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Terence M. Jones, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK. E-mail: t.m.jones@liverpool.ac.uk
References
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The Journal of Laryngology & Otology
  • ISSN: 0022-2151
  • EISSN: 1748-5460
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-laryngology-and-otology
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