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Presentation of automated procedural guidance in surgical simulation: results of two randomised controlled trials

  • S Wijewickrema (a1), Y Zhou (a1), I Ioannou (a1), B Copson (a1), P Piromchai (a1) (a2), C Yu (a3), R Briggs (a1), J Bailey (a4), G Kennedy (a5) and S O'Leary (a1)...
Abstract
Objective:

To investigate the effectiveness and usability of automated procedural guidance during virtual temporal bone surgery.

Methods:

Two randomised controlled trials were performed to evaluate the effectiveness, for medical students, of two presentation modalities of automated real-time procedural guidance in virtual reality simulation: full and step-by-step visual presentation of drillable areas. Presentation modality effectiveness was determined through a comparison of participants’ dissection quality, evaluated by a blinded otologist, using a validated assessment scale.

Results:

While the provision of automated guidance on procedure improved performance (full presentation, p = 0.03; step-by-step presentation, p < 0.001), usage of the two different presentation modalities was vastly different (full presentation, 3.73 per cent; step-by-step presentation, 60.40 per cent).

Conclusion:

Automated procedural guidance in virtual temporal bone surgery is effective in improving trainee performance. Step-by-step presentation of procedural guidance was engaging, and therefore more likely to be used by the participants.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Dr Sudanthi Wijewickrema, Department of Surgery (Otolaryngology), University of Melbourne, Level 5, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, 32, Gisborne Street, East Melbourne, VIC 3002, Australia Fax: +61 3 9663 1958 E-mail: swijewickrem@unimelb.edu.au
Footnotes
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Presented at the 14th Australasian Auditory Neuroscience Workshop, 4 December 2016, Hobart, Australia.

Footnotes
References
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The Journal of Laryngology & Otology
  • ISSN: 0022-2151
  • EISSN: 1748-5460
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-laryngology-and-otology
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