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  • Silas W. Allard (a1) (a2)
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1 Witte, John Jr., “The Study of Law and Religion in the United States: An Interim Report,” Ecclesiastical Law Journal 14, no. 3 (2012): 327–54, at 327.

2 Sandberg, Russell, “Snakepits & Sandpits,” in Research Handbook on Interdisciplinary Approaches to Law and Religion, ed. Sandberg, Russell et al. (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019), 236, at 3–4; see also Sandberg, Russell, “Prologue,” in Leading Works in Law and Religion, ed. Sandberg, Russell (London: Routledge, 2018), 119.

3 Sandberg, Russell, Law and Religion (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 1012.

4 Asad, Talal, Genealogies of Religion: Discipline and Reasons of Power in Christianity and Islam (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993), chapter 4, especially pp. 135–39.

5 The course remains part of the curriculum at Emory and is now taught by my colleague Dr. Shlomo Pill.

6 Sandberg, “Snakepits & Sandpits,” 6.

7 Sandberg, 8.

8 I adapt the term boundary consciousness from Devaka Premawardhana's discussion of “border consciousness.” Premawardhana, Devaka, Faith in Flux: Pentecostalism and Mobility in Rural Mozambique (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018), 90.

9 Witte, “The Study of Law and Religion in the United States,” 344. Witte is not alone in making this assessment, nor is the United States unique as a site of contestation on these issues. See, for example, the presence of family law matters in several prominent survey works in the field: Ferrari, Silvio, ed., Routledge Handbook of Law and Religion (London: Routledge, 2015); Ahdar, Rex, ed., Research Handbook on Law and Religion (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018); Sandberg, ed., Leading Works in Law and Religion; Sandberg et al., eds., Research Handbook on Interdisciplinary Approaches to Law and Religion.

10 Aburabia, Rawia, “Family, Nation Building, and Citizenship: The Legal Representation of Muslim Women in the Ban against Bigamy Clause of 1951,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue).

11 Aburabia, “Family, Nation Building, and Citizenship.”

12 Dequen, Jean-Philippe, “Filiation and Adoption among Muslims in India: The Quagmires of a Religious Minority Law,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Nurlaelawati, Euis and van Huis, Stijn Cornelis, “The Status of Children Born Out of Wedlock and Adopted Children in Indonesia: Interactions between Islamic, Adat, and Human Rights Norms,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Ali, Shaheen Sardar, “A Step Too Far? The Journey from ‘Biological’ to ‘Societal’ Filiation in the Child's Right to Name and Identity in Islamic and International Law,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Dörthe Engelcke, “Establishing Filiation (Nasab) and the Placement of Destitute Children into New Families: What Role Does the State Play?” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue).

13 Engelcke, Dörthe and Yassari, Nadjma, “Child Law in Muslim Jurisdictions: The Role of the State in Establishing Filiation (Nasab) and Protecting Parentless Children,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue).

14 JLR has been fortunate to publish two other symposia in the past five years that have likewise employed ethnographic, qualitative, and archival methods to offer rich analysis of lived experience. See Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Winnifred Fallers Sullivan, ed., “Re-Thinking Religious Freedom,” symposium, Journal of Law and Religion 29, no. 3 (2014): 358–509; Mirjam Künkler, ed., “The Bureaucratization of Religion in Southeast Asia,” symposium, Journal of Law and Religion 33, no. 2 (2018): 192–309.

15 Witte, John Jr., “Response to the Reviewers,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue), citing Witte, John Jr., “The Reformation of Marriage Law in Martin Luther's Germany: Its Significance Then and Now,” Journal of Law and Religion 4, no. 2 (1987): 293352.

16 Witte, “Response to the Reviewers.”

17 Jordan, Mark D., “Pedagogies of Natural Law,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Wilson, Robin Fretwell, “Family Law Isolationism and Church, State, and Family,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Broyde, Michael J., “Religious Edicts, Secular Law, and the Family,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Bix, Brian H., “Default Rules and Private Alterations,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Chaplin, Jonathan, “The Role of the State in Regulating the Marital Family,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue).

18 While I have focused on this issues' interdisciplinary approaches to law, religion, and family, the other content in the issue also expands the border consciousness of the field in other directions. The essay by Tova Hartman and Chaim Zicherman on gender segregated higher education in Israel reminds us of the close connection between political theory and law and religion. Hartman, Tova and Zicherman, Chaim, “Higher Education for Haredim in Israel,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue). In his article on the creation of dharma, Mark McClish upends established understandings of the relationship between law and religion in ancient India and, in the process, complicates long-standing theories in the sociology of law. McClish, Mark, “From Law to Dharma: State Law and Sacred Duty in Ancient India,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue). The second book review symposium in this issue focuses on the recent work of Cathleen Kaveny, one of law and religion's most interdisciplinary scholars. One of the characteristics of Kaveny's recent work, highlighted throughout the essays collected here, is her concern for what the disciplines of religious ethics and law can teach each other methodologically and normatively. See Green, M. Christian, “Paths and Pedagogies in Law and Ethics: On Cathleen Kaveny, Ethics at the Edges of Law: Christian Moralists and American Legal Thought,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Smith, Ted A., “On Covenant, Irony, Providence, and the Stance of the Prophet: Thoughts in Light of Cathleen Kaveny's Prophecy without Contempt,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Rothchild, Jonathan, “Talking Controversies: Why Dialogue Matters for Law, Religion, and Morality,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue); Lee, Kevin P., “Teaching Balance, Autonomy, and Solidarity in Law: Cathleen Kaveny, Law's Virtues: Fostering Autonomy and Solidarity in American Society,” Journal of Law and Religion 34, no. 3 (2019) (this issue).

19 Scherschligt, Michael and Yates, Wilson, “Editors’ Preface,” Journal of Law and Religion 1, no. 1 (1983): 12, 1 (emphasis added).

EDITORIAL

  • Silas W. Allard (a1) (a2)

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