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About Face: Forensic Genetic Testing for Race and Visible Traits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Extract

“DNAPrint Genomics, Inc. has applied the most recent advancements in human genomic technology for the deciphering of an individual's race. We are proud to introduce to the forensic community DNA WITNESS 2.0, a genetic test for the deduction of the heritable component of race, called Biogeographical Ancestry (BGA).”

–Z. Gaskin

“One definite and obvious consequence of the complexity of human demographic history is that races in any meaningful sense of the term do not exist in the human species.”

–D. B. Goldstein and L. Chikhi

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2006

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References

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