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Examining the impact of protean and boundaryless career attitudes upon subjective career success

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2015

Mihaela Enache
Affiliation:
Department of Management, ETSEIAT, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Catalunya, Spain
Jose M Sallan
Affiliation:
Department of Management, ETSEIAT, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Catalunya, Spain
Pep Simo
Affiliation:
Department of Management, ETSEIAT, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Catalunya, Spain
Vicenc Fernandez
Affiliation:
Department of Management, ETSEIAT, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Catalunya, Spain

Abstract

This research is aimed at analyzing the relationship between the underlying dimensions of boundaryless (boundaryless mindset and organizational mobility preference) and protean (self-directed and values-driven) career attitudes and subjective career success, within today's complex and dynamic organizational context in which careers are unfolding. Drawing on a sample of 150 Spanish professionals from the Catalonia region, which enabled hypotheses testing by means of hierarchical regression analysis, the research results suggest that self-direction in managing one's career and vocational development is instrumental in achieving subjective career success. Organizational mobility preference was found to be negatively associated with individuals' perceptions of the success achieved in their careers. Furthermore, the study suggests some future research lines that could draw more light upon the hypothesized relationships.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management 2011

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