Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-g7stk Total loading time: 0.305 Render date: 2021-04-10T12:39:30.688Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Behaviour, Subsequent Sleep, and Dreaming

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2018

Ralph J. Berger
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Edinburgh
Ian Oswald
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Edinburgh

Extract

In the course of the past few years, a series of related studies (Aserinsky and Kleitman, 1955; Goodenough et al., 1959; Wolpert and Trosman, 1958) has demonstrated beyond doubt the association of normal dreaming with the appearance of rapid, binocularly synchronous eye-movements. It has also been claimed that the rapid eye-movements (REMs) represent scanning movements made by the dreamer as he “watches” the visual events of the dream (Dement and Kleitman, 1957a; Dement and Wolpert, 1958). The REMs are absent during dreaming among those with life-long blindness, but are retained for some years by those whose blindness arises later than childhood (Berger et al., 1962a). In a study of undisturbed nocturnal sleep by Dement and Kleitman (1957b) periods of eye-movements were observed to occur fairly regularly at about 90-minute intervals throughout the night in association with the lightest phases of cyclic variation in depth of sleep, as indicated by the electroencephalogram (EEG). These REM periods had a mean duration of about 20 minutes, and 4–6 occurred per night.

Type
Psychological
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1962 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Aserinsky, E., and Kleitman, N., J. appl. Physiol., 1955, 8, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benoit, O., and Bloch, V., J. Physiol. (Paris), 1960, 52, 17.Google Scholar
Berger, R. J., Science, 1961, 134, 840.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Idem , Olley, P. C., and Oswald, I., Quart. J. exp. Psychol., 1962a, 14 (in press).Google Scholar
Idem , Jaramilo, R. A., Keddie, K. M. G., Olley, P. C., Oswald, I., and Plunkett, G. B., 1962b (to be published).Google Scholar
Bliss, E. L., Clark, L. D., and West, C. D., Arch. Neurol. Psychiat., 1959, 81, 348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brauchi, J. T., and West, L. J., J. Amer. med. Ass., 1959, 171, 11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dement, W., Electroenceph. clin. Neurophysiol., 1958, 10, 291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Idem , Science, 1960a, 131, 1705.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Idem , Science, 1960b, 132, 1420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Idem , and Kleitman, N., J. exp. Psychol., 1957a, 53, 339.Google Scholar
Idem and Kleitman, N., Electroenceph. clin. Neurophysiol., 1957b, 9, 673.Google Scholar
Idem and Wolpert, E. A., J. exp. Psychol., 1958, 55, 543.Google Scholar
Goodenough, D. R., Shapiro, A., Holden, M., and Steinschriber, L., J. abnorm. soc. Psychol., 1959, 59, 295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horovitz, Z. P., and Chow, M. I., Science, 1961, 134, 945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jouvet, M., Michel, F., and Mounier, D., Rev. neurol., 1960, 103, 189.Google Scholar
Kraepelin, E., Psychol. Arb., 1906, 5, 1.Google Scholar
Loomis, A. L., Harvey, E. N., and Hobart, G. A., J. exp. Psychol., 1937, 21, 127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marbach, G., and Schaff, G., C.R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 1960, 154, 408.Google Scholar
Morris, G. O., Williams, H. L., and Lubin, A., Arch. gen. Psychiat., 1960, 2, 247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oswald, I., Sleeping and Waking: Physiology and Psychology, 1962. Amsterdam: Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tyler, D. B., Dis. nerv. Syst., 1955, 16, 293.Google Scholar
Ullman, M., Science, 1960, 132, 1418.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolpert, E. A., and Trosman, H., Arch. Neurol. Psychiat., 1958, 79, 603.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 515 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 08th February 2018 - 10th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Behaviour, Subsequent Sleep, and Dreaming
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Behaviour, Subsequent Sleep, and Dreaming
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Behaviour, Subsequent Sleep, and Dreaming
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *