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Function and Training of the Clinical Psychologist

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2018

H. J. Eysenck*
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital

Extract

The past ten years have seen a spectacular increase in the number of psychologists who have elected to take up the type of work usually referred to as “clinical,” This increase has been most marked in the U.S.A., where now some 25 per cent. of the members of the American Psychological Association are employed in this field, and where Government regulations and training schemes set up under the V.A. (Veterans' Administration) make it almost certain that within a few years clinical psychology will constitute the main field of employment for psychologists (1). In Canada, too, there has been a similar growth, leading to all the problems of registration and certification which are currently being tackled in the United States (2). In this country, while psychologists have occasionally been employed in hospitals for the mentally ill, the development of “clinical psychology” in any formal sense may be said to have started in 1947 with the foundation of the Psychological Department at the Institute of Psychiatry (Maudsley Hospital), one of whose objects was to give a course of training in clinical psychology to graduate students of psychology (7).

Type
Part I.—Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1950 

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References

(1) Black, J. D. (1949), “A Survey of Employment in Psychology and the Place of Personnel without the Ph.D.,” Amer. Psychol., 4, 3842.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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(3) Burt, C. (1949), “Recent Discussions of Juvenile Delinquency,” Brit. J. educ. Psychol., 19, 3143.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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(18) Rosenzweig, S., Root, W. T., and Pearson, G. B. (1944), “Education for Clinical Psychology,” J. consult. Psychol., 8, 354359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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