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Can the activation of analytic cognitive style determine endorsement of secular belief?

  • Joevarian Hudiyana (a1), Idhamsyah E. Putra (a2) (a3), Amarina A. Ariyanto (a1), Gagan H.T. Brama (a1) and Hamdi Muluk (a1)...

Abstract

The present study examined the effect of analytical thought priming on individual secular beliefs. In Study 1 (N = 64), we employed analytical thinking priming and examined whether such priming can influence the participants’ endorsement of secular belief. In Study 2 (N = 85), we employed another form of treatment condition to enhance analytical thinking and explored what components of secular beliefs were most affected by such condition. The results of both studies showed that participants primed to think with an analytic style possess higher secular belief, but not for all the domains of secular belief. We focused the discussion on the implications of these findings and the strength of secular belief measure.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Joevarian Hudiyana, Email: joehudijana@gmail.com

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Keywords

Can the activation of analytic cognitive style determine endorsement of secular belief?

  • Joevarian Hudiyana (a1), Idhamsyah E. Putra (a2) (a3), Amarina A. Ariyanto (a1), Gagan H.T. Brama (a1) and Hamdi Muluk (a1)...

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