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Social Projection to Outgroups: Japanese Students Refer to Psychologically Distant Others

  • Chieko Yoshihara (a1), Reina Takamatsu (a2) and Jiro Takai (a2)
Abstract

This study focused on social projection (SP) to outgroups. Two studies were conducted to show that SP to outgroups was greater than to ingroups when an issue is more relevant to the outgroup than to the ingroup and vice versa. These experiments were conducted for students of different schools (N1 = 92, N2 = 203). The results confirmed that students overestimated agreement with working adults when the topic was more relevant to working people. Also, when the topic was relevant to students, they overestimated agreement of other students relative to the working adults. These results suggested the relevance of the opinion was more important than perceived social distance when Japanese students refer to others.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Chieko Yoshihara, Okuda, Mihama-cho, Chita-gun, Aichi-pref, Japan 470–3295. Email: chieko@n-fukushi.ac.jp
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Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1834-4909
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-pacific-rim-psychology
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