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Do knowledge gains from public information campaigns persist over time? Results from a survey experiment on the Norwegian pension reform*

  • HENNING FINSERAAS (a1) (a2), NIKLAS JAKOBSSON (a1) (a3) and MIKAEL SVENSSON (a4) (a5)
Abstract
Abstract

Government authorities use resources on information campaigns in order to inform citizens about relevant policy changes. The motivation is usually that individuals sometimes are ill-informed about the public policies relevant for their choices. In a survey experiment where the treatment group was provided with public information material on the social security system, we assess the short- and medium-term knowledge effects. We show that the short run effects of the information on knowledge disappear completely within 4 months. The findings illustrate the limits of public information campaigns to improve knowledge about relevant policy reforms.

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The research reported in this paper was supported by a grant from the Research Council of Norway (project 210446).

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References
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Journal of Pension Economics & Finance
  • ISSN: 1474-7472
  • EISSN: 1475-3022
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-pension-economics-and-finance
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