Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-jcldq Total loading time: 0.215 Render date: 2021-05-09T12:05:49.089Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The Effect of White Social Prejudice on Support for American Democracy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 February 2020

Steven V. Miller
Affiliation:
Clemson University
Nicholas T. Davis
Affiliation:
University of Alabama
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Social prejudice constitutes an unwillingness to associate with individuals whose cultural or racial background differs from one's own group. Such prejudice is a particularly thorny problem in the context of democracy, which requires citizens to minimally respect such differences. In this paper, we assess the relationships between these attitudes and support for democratic institutions. Using World Values Survey data from 1995 to 2011, we find that prejudice toward cultural, ethnic, or racial “others” reduces the value that white Americans assign to democracy. We also find white Americans who exhibit these attitudes are more likely to dismiss the value of separation of powers and are more likely to support army rule. These findings imply that exclusionary rhetoric targeted toward non-white groups is accompanied by lower baseline support for democracy. We close with a discussion of how our analyses inform the study of Americans' attitudes toward democracy

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Race, Ethnicity, and Politics Section of the American Political Science Association 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

Replication files are available at https://github.com/svmiller/woi.

References

Adler, David R.K. 2018. “The Centrist Paradox: Political Correlates of the Democratic Disconnect.” https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract/_id=3214467.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allport, Gordon W. 1954. The Nature of Prejudice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company.Google Scholar
Ariely, Gal, and Davidov, Eldad. 2011. “Can We Rate Public Support for Democracy in A Comparable Way? Cross-National Equivalence of Democratic Attitudes in the World Value Survey.Social Indicators Research 104 (2): 271–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bahns, Angela J. 2017. “Threat as Justification of Prejudice.” Group Processes & Intergroup Relations 20 (1): 5274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Banks, Antoine J., and Valentino, Nicholas A.. 2012. “Emotional Substrates of White Racial Attitudes.” American Journal of Political Science 56 (2): 286–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bateman, David A. 2018. Disenfranchising Democracy: Constructing the Electorate in the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berry, John W. 2006. “Mutual Attitudes Among Immigrants and Ethnocultural Groups in Canada.” International Journal of Intercultural Relations 30 (6): 719–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bohman, James. 2000. Public Deliberation: Pluralism, Complexity, and Democracy. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
Brewer, Marilynn B. 1999. “The Psychology of Prejudice: Ingroup Love and Outgroup Hate?Journal of Social Issues 55 (3): 429–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chung, Yeojin, Gelman, Andrew, Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia, Liu, Jingchen, and Dorie, Vincent. 2015. “Weakly Informative Prior for Point Estimation of Covariance Matrices in Hierarchical Models.” Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics 40 (2): 136–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dahl, Robert A. 1989. Democracy and Its Critics. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
DeSante, Christopher D., and Smith, Candis W.. n.d. Racial Stasis: The Millennial Generation and the Stagnation of Racial Attitudes in American Politics. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Eagly, Alice H., and Diekman, Amanda B.. 2005. “What Is the Problem? Prejudice as an Attitude-in-Context.” In On the Nature of Prejudice: Fifty Years After Allport, eds Dovidio, John F., Glick, Peter, and Rudman, Laurie A.. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell Publishing, 1935.Google Scholar
Fowers, Blaine J., and Richardson, Frank C.. 1996. “Why Is Multiculturalism Good?American Psychologist 51 (6): 609–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gaertner, Samuel L., and Dovidio, John F.. 2005. “Categorization, Recategorization, and Intergroup Bias.” In On the Nature of Prejudice: Fifty Years After Allport, eds Dovidio, John F., Glick, Peter, and Rudman, Laurie A.. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell Publishing, 7188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gelman, Andrew. 2008. “Scaling Regression Inputs by Dividing by Two Standard Deviations.” Statistics in Medicine 27 (15): 2865–73.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gibson, James L. 2011. “Political Intolerance in the Context of Democratic Theory.” In The Oxford Handbook of Political Science, eds Goodin, Robert E.. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 409–30.Google Scholar
Gilens, Martin. 1999. Why Americans Hate Welfare: Race, Media, and the Politics of Antipoverty Policy. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glenn, Evelyn Nakano. 2004. Unequal Freedom: How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizenship and Labor. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Henry, P.J., and Napier, Jaime L.. 2017. “Education Is Related to Greater Ideological Prejudice.” Public Opinion Quarterly 81 (4): 930–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henry, P.J., and Sears, David O.. 2008. “Symbolic and Modern Racism.” In Encyclopedia of Race and Racism, eds Moore, John H.. Detroit, MI: Macmillan Reference, 111–17.Google Scholar
Hopkins, Daniel J., and Washington, Samantha. 2019. “The Rise of Trump, the Fall of Prejudice? Tracking White Americans’ Racial Attitudes 2008–2018 via a Panel Survey.” https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract/_id=3378076.Google Scholar
Jardina, Ashley. 2019. White Identity Politics. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinder, Donald R., and Kam, Cindy D.. 2009. Us Against Them: Ethnocentric Foundations of American Opinion. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinder, Donald R., and Sanders, Lynn M.. 1996. Divided by Color: Racial Politics and Democratic Ideals. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Kivisto, Peter, and Rezaev, Andrey. 2018. “Racial Democracy, Multiculturalism, and Inequality.” In Handbook of the Sociology of Racial and Ethnic Relations, eds Batur, Pinar and Feagin, Joe R.. New York, NY: Springer, 171–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lipset, Seymour Martin. 1959. “Some Social Requisites of Democracy: Economic Development and Political Legitimacy.” American Political Science Review 53 (1): 69105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magalhaes, Pedro C. 2014. “Government Effectiveness and Support for Democracy.” European Journal of Political Research 53 (1): 7797.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McConahay, John B., and Hough, Joseph C. Jr. 1976. “Symbolic Racism.” Journal of Social Issues 32 (2): 2345.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mickey, Robert. 2015. Paths Out of Dixie: The Democratization of Authoritarian Enclaves in America's Deep South. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Miller, Steven V. 2017. “Economic Threats or Societal Turmoil? Understanding Preferences for Authoritarian Political Systems.” Political Behavior 39 (2): 457–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pettigrew, Thomas F., and Tropp, Linda R.. 2006. “A Meta-Analytic Test of Intergroup Contact Theory.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 90 (5): 751–83.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rapp, Carolin, and Ackermann, Kathrin. 2016. “The Consequences of Social Intolerance on Non-Violent Protest.” European Political Science Review 8 (4): 567–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scacco, Alexandra, and Warren, Shana S.. 2018. “Can Social Contact Reduce Prejudice and Discrimination? Evidence From A Field Experiment in Nigeria.” American Political Science Review 112 (3): 654–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Svolik, Milan W. 2013. “Contracting on Violence: The Moral Hazard in Authoritarian Repression and Military Intervention in Politics.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 57 (5): 765–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tesler, Michael. 2016. Post-Racial or Most-Racial? Race and Politics in the Obama Era. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tileaga, Cristian. 2015. The Nature of Prejudice. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Valentino, Nicholas, Neuner, Fabian G., and Matthew Vandenbroek, L.. 2018. “The Changing Norms of Racial Political Rhetoric and the End of Racial Priming.” Journal of Politics 80 (3): 757–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogt, W. Paul. 1997. Tolerance & Education: Learning to Live with Diversity and Difference. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Welzel, Christian. 2013. Freedom Rising: Human Empowerment and the Quest for Emancipation. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: PDF

Miller and Davis supplementary material

Miller and Davis supplementary material

Download Miller and Davis supplementary material(PDF)
PDF 313 KB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Effect of White Social Prejudice on Support for American Democracy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Effect of White Social Prejudice on Support for American Democracy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Effect of White Social Prejudice on Support for American Democracy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *