Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-5dd2w Total loading time: 0.207 Render date: 2022-05-19T20:01:16.302Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Gender Differences in Smoking Behaviour and Cessation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2012

Iris Torchalla*
Affiliation:
Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHEOS), Vancouver, Canada. itorchalla@mail.cheos.ubc.ca
Chizimuzo T.C. Okoli
Affiliation:
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, Vancouver, Canada.
Natalie Hemsing
Affiliation:
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, Vancouver, Canada.
Lorraine Greaves
Affiliation:
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, Vancouver, Canada.
*
*Address for correspondence: Iris Torchalla, Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHEOS), 620B-1081 Burrard Street; Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6, Canada.

Abstract

This article reviews the literature to compare differential outcomes among men and women after smoking cessation, assess barriers they may face during cessation and provide recommendation to address gender-specific challenges in smoking cessation interventions. There is some evidence that women achieve lower abstinence rates than men after a quit attempt with nicotine replacement therapy, as well as without pharmacotherapy, and several underlying mechanisms were discussed to account for these findings. These include: (a) women have specific genetic variants that affect pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the medication, (b) hormonal influences increase nicotine metabolism and withdrawal symptoms, (c) women are more responsive to nonpharmacological aspects of smoking than men, (d) women are more vulnerable to depression and negative mood than men, (e) weight concerns are greater barriers for women than for men and (g) women receive less effective social support than men during a quit attempt. Gender-specific counselling that accounts for these factors and addresses the different needs of men and women may be a promising approach to improve long-term abstinence rates. However, more research is required to identify gender-related underlying mechanisms of differential smoking cessation outcomes, develop tailored interventions that account for gender differences and study the implementation and outcomes of gender-responsive treatment approaches.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Gender Differences in Smoking Behaviour and Cessation
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Gender Differences in Smoking Behaviour and Cessation
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Gender Differences in Smoking Behaviour and Cessation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *