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Mixed-Methods for Comparing Tobacco Cessation Interventions

  • Behnoosh Momin (a1), Antonio Neri (a1), Lei Zhang (a2), Jennifer Kahende (a2), Jennifer Duke (a3), Sonya Goode Green (a3), Ann Malarcher (a2) and Sherri L. Stewart (a1)...
Abstract

Introduction: The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) and National Tobacco Control Program (NTCP) are both well-positioned to promote the use of population-based tobacco cessation interventions, such as state quitlines and Web-based interventions.

Aims: This paper outlines the methodology used to conduct a comparative effectiveness research (CER) study of traditional and Web-based tobacco cessation and quitline promotion approaches.

Methods: A mixed-methods study with three components was designed to address the effect of promotional activities on service usage and the comparative effectiveness of population-based smoking cessation activities across multiple states.

Results/Findings: The cessation intervention component followed 7,902 smokers (4,307 quitline users and 3,595 Web intervention users) to ascertain prevalence of 30-day abstinence rates seven months after registering for smoking cessation services. User characteristics and quit success was compared across the two modalities. In the promotions component, reach and use of traditional and innovative promotion strategies were assessed for 24 states, including online advertising, state Web sites, social media, mobile applications, and their effects on quitline call volume. The partnership intervention component studied the extent of collaboration among six selected NCCCPs and NTCPs.

Conclusions: This study will guide program staff and clinicians with evidence-based recommendations and best practices for implementation of tobacco cessation within their patient and community populations and establish an evidence base that can be used for decision making.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Address for Correspondence: Behnoosh Momin, MS, MPH, 4770 Buford Highway, MS F-76, Atlanta, GA 30341. Email: fqv6@cdc.gov
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Journal of Smoking Cessation
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1834-2612
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-smoking-cessation
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