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Main gap for locally saturated elementary submodels of a homogeneous structure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 March 2014

Tapani Hyttinen
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, P.O. Box 4, 00014, University of Helsinki, Finland, E-mail: thyttine@cc.helsinki.fi
Saharon Shelah
Affiliation:
Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University Jerusalem, Israel Rutgers University, Hill CTR-Bush, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A., E-mail: shelah@math.huji.ac.il
Corresponding

Abstract

We prove a main gap theorem for locally saturated submodels of a homogeneous structure. We also study the number of locally saturated models, which are not elementarily embeddable into each other.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Association for Symbolic Logic 2001

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References

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