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Use of the nutrients in bamboo by the red panda (Ailurus fulgens)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 1999

Fuwen Wei
Affiliation:
Institute of Zoology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Zhongguancun Road, Haidian, Beijing, 100080, China
Zuojian Feng
Affiliation:
Institute of Zoology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Zhongguancun Road, Haidian, Beijing, 100080, China
Zuwang Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Zoology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Zhongguancun Road, Haidian, Beijing, 100080, China
Ang Zhou
Affiliation:
Institute of Rare Animals and Plants, Sichuan Normal College, Nanchong, Sichuan, 637002, China
Jinchu Hu
Affiliation:
Institute of Rare Animals and Plants, Sichuan Normal College, Nanchong, Sichuan, 637002, China
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Abstract

Nutrient use by the red panda Ailurus fulgens was measured in animals fed only on their natural bamboo Bashania spanostachya diet. The project was carried out at the field observation station of Yele Natural Reserve in Sichuan, China. Two-week long trials were conducted at monthly intervals from May to November 1995. Results showed that dry matter digestibility differed significantly among seasons and between diets. Digestibilities of dry matter and key nutrients were high in summer–autumn, intermediate in spring and low in winter. Shoots were more easily digested than leaves and exhibited the highest digestibility. These variations were positively correlated with nutrient contents in bamboo. The results also indicated that the red panda poorly processed its bamboo food. This was demonstrated by the lower digestion coefficients of dry matter and nutrients, especially that of cell wall constituents. This implied that microbial digestion only played a minor role in its digestive strategy, similar to the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca, another herbivorous carnivore. In addition, the transit of bamboo through the red panda gut was very rapid (2–4 h). In order to survive on this poor-quality diet, it seems that the red panda has to select high-quality items of bamboo such as tender leaves and shoots. These are ingested in large quantities (over 1.5 kg of fresh leaves and 4 kg of fresh shoots daily) that pass through the digestive tract fairly rapidly so as to maximize nutrient intake.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
1999 The Zoological Society of London

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