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An introduction to argumentation semantics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 December 2011

Pietro Baroni*
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Università di Brescia, Via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia, Italy; e-mail: baroni@ing.unibs.it, giacomin@ing.unibs.it
Martin Caminada*
Affiliation:
Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust, Université du Luxembourg, 6 rue Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi, L-1359 Luxembourg, Luxembourg; e-mail: martin.caminada@uni.lu
Massimiliano Giacomin*
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, Università di Brescia, Via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia, Italy; e-mail: baroni@ing.unibs.it, giacomin@ing.unibs.it

Abstract

This paper presents an overview on the state of the art of semantics for abstract argumentation, covering both some of the most influential literature proposals and some general issues concerning semantics definition and evaluation. As to the former point, the paper reviews Dung's original notions of complete, grounded, preferred, and stable semantics, as well as subsequently proposed notions like semi-stable, ideal, stage, and CF2 semantics, considering both the extension-based and the labelling-based approaches with respect to their definitions. As to the latter point, the paper presents an extensive set of general properties for semantics evaluation and analyzes the notions of argument justification and skepticism. The final part of the paper is focused on the discussion of some relationships between semantics properties and domain-specific requirements.

Type
Tutorial
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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References

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