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Charge-changing ion–ion collisions in heavy ion fusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2003

H. BRÄUNING
Affiliation:
Institut für Kernphysik, Justus-Liebig Universität, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
A. DIEHL
Affiliation:
Institut für Kernphysik, Justus-Liebig Universität, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
K.v. DIEMAR
Affiliation:
Institut für Kernphysik, Justus-Liebig Universität, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
A. THEIß
Affiliation:
Institut für Kernphysik, Justus-Liebig Universität, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
R. TRASSL
Affiliation:
Institut für Kernphysik, Justus-Liebig Universität, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
E. SALZBORN
Affiliation:
Institut für Kernphysik, Justus-Liebig Universität, D-35392 Giessen, Germany
I. HOFMANN
Affiliation:
Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung–Darmstadt, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany

Abstract

In heavy ion fusion, the compression of the DT pellet requires high intensity beams of ions in the gigaelectron volt energy range. Charge-changing collisions due to intrabeam scattering can have a high impact on the design of adequate accelerator and storage rings. Not only do intensity losses have to be taken into account, but also the deposition of energy on the beam lines after bending magnets, for example, may be nonnegligible. The center-of-mass energy for these intrabeam collisions is typically in the kiloelectron volt range for beam energies in the order of several gigaelectron volts. In this article, we present experimental cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in homonuclear collisions of Ar4+, Kr4+, and Xe4+, and for charge transfer only in homonuclear collisions of Pb4+ and Bi4+. Using a hypothetical 100-Tm synchrotron as an example, expected particle losses are calculated based on the experimental data. The results are compared with expectations for singly charged Bi+ ions, which are usually considered for heavy ion fusion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press

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