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Indigenous Management Research in China from an Engaged Scholarship Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2015

Andrew H. Van de Ven
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota, U.S.
Runtian Jing
Affiliation:
University of Electronic Science and Technology, China

Abstract

This commentary discusses the four articles in this special MOR issue on indigenous management research in China. It begins by recognizing the importance of indigenous research not only for understanding the specific knowledge of local phenomena, but also for advancing general theoretical knowledge across cultural boundaries. Challenging to undertake, we propose a method of engaged scholarship for conducting indigenous research. The four articles in this special issue provide good examples of applying principles of engaged scholarship in their indigenous Chinese management studies.

Type
Special Issue Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © International Association for Chinese Management Research 2012

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