Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-dxj8b Total loading time: 1.137 Render date: 2023-01-29T10:25:12.624Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Assessment of marine biofilm attachment and growth for antifouling surfaces under static and controlled hydrodynamic conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 July 2011

Maria Salta
Affiliation:
national Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
Julian A. Wharton
Affiliation:
national Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
Paul Stoodley
Affiliation:
national Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
Robert J.K. Wood
Affiliation:
national Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.
Keith R. Stokes
Affiliation:
national Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK. Physical Sciences Department, Dstl, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP4 0JQ, UK.
Get access

Abstract

This investigation has assessed natural product antifouling performance of an isolated compound from a terrestrial source against marine biofilm forming bacteria, Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Novel bioassay protocols using the hydrodynamic system and its well plate microfluidics capability were developed to test the in situ antifouling efficacy of the natural product against biofilm attachment under two shear stresses (0.07 and 0.3 Pa). The hydrodynamic results allowed for the first time the direct observation of the natural product influence on newly attached marine biofilms and the evolution of the antifouling affect with time. Biofilm attachment behaviour appeared to be markedly different in the presence of the natural product, illustrated by limited cluster and extracellular polymeric substance formation which suggests an interference of the bacterial attachment mechanisms. Ultimately, this is fundamental in developing greater understanding of the biofilm kinetics. These observations were confirmed using epifluoresence and confocal microscopy, with the additional corroborative data on bacterial cell integrity using the LIVE / DEAD nucleic acid kit.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

1. Salta, M., Wharton, J.A., Stoodley, P., Dennington, S., Goodes, L., Werwinski, S., Mart, U., Wood, R.J.K., Stokes, K.R., Special Issue on Green Tribology – Designing biomimetic antifouling surfaces, Phil Trans A Royal Society, 368, 47294754 (2010).10.1098/rsta.2010.0195CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Maximilien, R., De Nys, R., Holmstrom, C., Gram, L., Kjelleberg, S., Steinberg, P., Bacterial fouling is regulated by secondary metabolites from the red alga Delisea pulchra, Aquat. Microbial. Ecol. 15, 233246 (1998).10.3354/ame015233CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Ekblad, T., Bergstrom, G., Ederth, T., Conlan, S., Mutton, R., Clare, A., Wang, S., Liu, Y., Zhao, Q., D’Souza, F., Donnelly, G., Willemsen, P., Pettitt, M., Callow, M., Callow, J., Liedberg, B., Poly (ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogel surfaces for antifouling applications in marine and freshwater environments, Biomacromolecules 9, 27752783 (2008).10.1021/bm800547mCrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Akesso, L., Pettitt, M., Callow, J., Callow, M., Stallard, J., Teer, D., Liu, C., Wang, S., Zhao, Q., Willemsen, P., The potential of nano-structured silicon oxide type coatings deposited by PACVD for control of aquatic biofouling. Biofouling, 25, 5567 (2009).10.1080/08927010802444275CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5. D’Souza, F., Bruin, A., Biersteker, R., Donnelly, G., Klijnstra, J., Rentrop, C., Willemsen, P., Bacterial assay for the rapid assessment of antifouling and fouling release properties of coatings and materials, J. Indust. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 37, 363370 (2010).10.1007/s10295-009-0681-1CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6. Benoit, M.R., Conant, C.G., Ionescu-Zanetti, C., Schwartz, M. and Matin, A., New Device for High-Throughput Viability Screening of Flow Biofilms, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76, 41364142 (2010).10.1128/AEM.03065-09CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7. O’Brien, P., Molecular mechanisms of quinone cytocity, Chemico-Biological Interactions, 80, 141 (1991).10.1016/0009-2797(91)90029-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Rieu, A., Briandet, R., Habimana, O., Garmyn, D., Guzzo, J., Piveteau, P., Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e biofilms: no mushrooms but a network of knitted chains, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74, 44914497 (2008).10.1128/AEM.00255-08CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9. Beyenal, H., Lewandowski, Z., Internal and external mass transfer in biofilms grown at various flow velocities, Biotechnology Progress, 18, 5561 (2002).10.1021/bp010129sCrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Assessment of marine biofilm attachment and growth for antifouling surfaces under static and controlled hydrodynamic conditions
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Assessment of marine biofilm attachment and growth for antifouling surfaces under static and controlled hydrodynamic conditions
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Assessment of marine biofilm attachment and growth for antifouling surfaces under static and controlled hydrodynamic conditions
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *