Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-ct24h Total loading time: 0.32 Render date: 2022-05-19T19:20:16.715Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Durability of Materials in a Stress-Response Framework: Acrylic Materials for Photovoltaic Systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 July 2012

Myles P. Murray
Affiliation:
Solar Durability Lifetime Extension Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 U.S.A.
Laura S. Bruckman
Affiliation:
Solar Durability Lifetime Extension Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 U.S.A.
Roger H. French
Affiliation:
Solar Durability Lifetime Extension Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 U.S.A.
Get access

Abstract

In the development of novel materials for enhanced photovoltaic (PV) performance, it is critical to have quantitative knowledge of the initial performance, as well as the performance of these materials over the required 25-year lifetime of the PV system. Lifetime and degradation science (L&DS) allows for the development of new metrology and metrics, coupled to degradation mechanisms and rates. Induced absorbance to dose (IAD), a new metric being developed for solar radiation durability studies of solar and environmentally exposed photovoltaic materials, is defined as the rate of photodarkening or photobleaching of a material as a function of total absorbed solar radiation dose. In a reliability engineering framework, these quantitative degradation rates can be determined at various solar irradiances making possible real time and accelerated testing. The potential to predict power losses in a photovoltaic system over time caused by the accumulation of this kind of degradation can be calculated for real time applications or extrapolated for accelerated exposure conditions. Three formulations of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) used for mirror augmented PV systems were analyzed for the changes in IAD after accelerated testing.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. U. S., D. O. E. Workshop on Science for Energy Technology workshop report, for DOE Basic Energy Science Advisory Committee, August 2010. http://science.energy.gov/~/media/bes/pdf/reports/files/setf_rpt.pdf Google Scholar
2. French, R.H., Rodrıguez-Parada, J. M., Yang, M. K., Derryberry, R. A., Pfeiffenberger, N. T., “Optical properties of polymeric materials for concentrator photovoltaic systems,” Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells, 95, (2011), 20772086.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Murray, Myles P., Gordon, Devin, Brown, Scott A., Lin, Wei-Chun, Shell, Kara A., Schuetz, Mark A., Fowler, Sean, Elman, Jim, French, Roger H., “Solar radiation durability framework applied to acrylic solar mirrors,” Proc. SPIE 8112-01 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. French, Roger H., Murray, Myles P., Lin, Wei-Chun, Shell, Kara A., Brown, Scott A., Schuetz, Mark A., Davis, Robert J., “Solar radiation durability of materials components and systems for low concentration photovoltaics,” IEEE Energy Tech., 2011.Google Scholar
5. French, R. H., Rodríguez-Parada, J. M., Yang, M. K., Lemon, M. F., Romano, E. C., Boydell, P., “Materials for concentrator photovoltaic systems: optical properties and solar radiation durability,” CPV-6: International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaics, Freiburg, Germany, April 2010.Google Scholar
6. Q-Lab, Q-Lab Headquarters & Instruments Division 800 Canterbury Road Cleveland, OH 44145 USA, Tel.: +1-440-835-8700, Google Scholar
7. ASTM G154, Standard practice for operating fluorescent light apparatus for UV exposure of nonmetallic, materials, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, 2005.Google Scholar
8. ASTM E313, Standard practice for calculating yellowness and whiteness indices from instrumentally measured color coordinates, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, 2005.Google Scholar
9. Miller, D. C., Gedvilas, L. M., To, B., Kennedy, C.E. and Kurtz, S. R., “Durability of poly(methyl methacrylate) lenses used in concentrating photovoltaic modules,” Proc. SPIE 7407, 74070G (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Durability of Materials in a Stress-Response Framework: Acrylic Materials for Photovoltaic Systems
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Durability of Materials in a Stress-Response Framework: Acrylic Materials for Photovoltaic Systems
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Durability of Materials in a Stress-Response Framework: Acrylic Materials for Photovoltaic Systems
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *