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Fabrication and Characterisation of the First Graphene Ring Micro Electrodes (GRIMEs)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2012

J.W. Dickinson
Affiliation:
Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR, U.K.
F.P.L. Andrieux
Affiliation:
Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR, U.K.
C. Boxall
Affiliation:
Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR, U.K.
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Abstract

We report the fabrication and characterisation of the first graphene ring micro electrodes, formed by dip coating fibre optics with subsequently reduced graphite oxide. The behaviour of the so-formed Graphene RIng Micro Electrodes (GRIMEs) is studied using the ferricyanide probe redox system while electrode thicknesses is assessed using established electrochemical methods. A ring electrode of ∼73 nm thickness is produced on 220 μm diameter fibre optics, corresponding to an inner to outer radius ratio of >0.999, so allowing for use of extant analytical descriptions of very thin ring micro electrodes in data analysis. GRIMEs are highly reliable (current response invariant over >3000 scans) with the microring design allowing for efficient use of electrochemically active graphene edge sites. Further, the associated nA scale currents neatly obviate issues relating to the high resistivity of undoped graphene. Thus, the use of graphene in ring micro electrodes improves the reliability of existing micro electrode designs and expands the range of use of graphene-based electrochemical devices.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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