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Graphyne nanotubes: New Families of Carbon Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

Vitor R. Coluci
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083–970, Campinas, SP, Brazil NanoTech Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, 830688, Richardson, Texas
Scheila F. Braga
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083–970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
Sergio B. Legoas
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083–970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
Douglas S. Galvão
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083–970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
Ray H. Baughman
Affiliation:
NanoTech Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, 830688, Richardson, Texas
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Abstract

Fundamentally new families of carbon single walled nanotubes are proposed. These nanotubes, called graphynes, result from the elongation of covalent interconnections of graphite-based nanotubes by the introduction of yne groups. Similarly to ordinary nanotubes, armchair, zig-zag, and chiral graphyne nanotubes are possible. We present here results for the electronic properties of graphyne based tubes obtained from tight-binding and ab initio density functional methods.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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