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Growth and Morphology of Pentacene Films on Oxide Surfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Ricardo Ruiz
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy Nashville, TN 37235, U.S.A.
Leonard C. Feldman
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy Nashville, TN 37235, U.S.A. Solid-State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A.
Richard F. Haglund
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Astronomy Nashville, TN 37235, U.S.A.
Rodney A. McKee
Affiliation:
Solid-State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A.
Norbert Koch
Affiliation:
Princeton University, Princeton Materials Institute Princeton, NJ 08542, U.S.A.
Bert A. Nickel
Affiliation:
Princeton University, Princeton Materials Institute Princeton, NJ 08542, U.S.A.
Jens Pflaum
Affiliation:
Princeton University, Princeton Materials Institute Princeton, NJ 08542, U.S.A.
Giacinto Scoles
Affiliation:
Princeton University, Princeton Materials Institute Princeton, NJ 08542, U.S.A.
Antoine Kahn
Affiliation:
Princeton University, Princeton Materials Institute Princeton, NJ 08542, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Pentacene thin films were grown in ultra high vacuum on amorphous SiO2 and on a high dielectric constant material, crystalline BaTiO3. During pentacene deposition, substrates were held at three different temperatures (-650, 250 and 750 C). In general, three different morphologies were identified: a first closed interfacial layer, a thin film mode composed of faceted grains with single molecule step height, and a volume mode with features substantially higher than those of the thin film mode. Analysis was carried out by atomic force microscopy and in some cases by synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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