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Heat Transfer Performance of Porous Copper Fabricated by Lost Carbonate Sintering Process

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Liping Zhang
Affiliation:
l.p.zhang@liv.ac.uk, University of Liverpool, Department of Engineering, Liverpool, United Kingdom
David Mullen
Affiliation:
D.Mullen@thermacore.com, Thermacore Europe Ltd, Ashington, United Kingdom
Kevin Lynn
Affiliation:
k.v.lynn@thermacore.com, Thermacore Europe Ltd, Ashington, United Kingdom
Yuyuan Zhao
Affiliation:
y.y.zhao@liv.ac.uk, University of Liverpool, Department of Engineering, Liverpool, United Kingdom
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Abstract

The heat transfer coefficients of porous copper fabricated by the lost carbonate sintering (LCS) process with porosity range from 57% to 82% and pore size from 150 to 1500 μm have been experimentally determined in this study. The sample was attached to the heat plate and assembled into a forced convection system using water as the coolant. The effectiveness of the heat removal from the heat plate through the porous copper-water system was tested under different water flow rates from 0.3 to 2.0 L/min and an input heat flux of 1.3 MW/m2. Porosity has a large effect on the heat transfer performance and the optimum porosity was found to be around 62%. Pore size has a much less effect on the heat transfer performance compared to porosity. High water flow rates enhanced the heat transfer performance for all the samples.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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