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High Pressure Induced Binding Between Linear Carbon Chains and Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2015

Gustavo Brunetto
Affiliation:
Applied Physics Department, State University of Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
Nádia F. Andrade
Affiliation:
Physics Department, Federal University of Ceará, 60440-900, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil
Douglas S. Galvão
Affiliation:
Applied Physics Department, State University of Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
Antônio G. Souza Filho
Affiliation:
Physics Department, Federal University of Ceará, 60440-900, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil
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Abstract

Recent studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous media have showed that water can significantly affect the tube mechanical properties. CNTs under hydrostatic compression can preserve their elastic properties up to large pressure values, while exhibiting exceptional resistance to mechanical loadings. It was experimentally observed that CNTs with encapsulated linear carbon chains (LCCs), when subjected to high hydrostatic pressure values, present irreversible red shifts in some of their vibrational frequencies. In order to address the cause of this phenomenon, we have carried out fully atomistic reactive (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for model structures mimicking the experimental conditions. We have considered the cases of finite and infinite (cyclic boundary conditions) CNTs filled with LCCs (LCC@CNTs) of different lengths (from 9 up to 40 atoms). Our results show that increasing the hydrostatic pressure causes the CNT to be deformed in an inhomogeneous way due to the LCC presence. The LCC/CNT interface regions exhibit convex curvatures, which results in more reactive sites, thus favoring the formation of covalent chemical bonds between the chain and the nanotube. This process is irreversible with the newly formed bonds continuing to exist even after releasing the external pressure and causing an irreversibly red shift in the chain vibrational modes from 1850 to 1500 cm−1.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

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