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In Situ Chemical Functionalization of a Single Carbon Nanotube Functionalized AFM Tip using a Correlated Optical and Atomic Force Microscope

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 January 2011

Ifat Kaplan-Ashiri
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712
Eric J. Titus
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712
Katherine A. Willets
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712
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Abstract

We present a method for performing nanoscale wet chemistry on single carbon nanotubes as well as spectroscopic characterization of the functionalized molecules using a coupled atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical microscope. An AFM probe was functionalized with a single multiwalled carbon nanotube and then locally oxidized by dipping it into nitric acid (HNO3) in situ using AFM manipulation. Raman scattering was collected from the carbon nanotube functionalized probe before and after the oxidation reaction. An increase in the Raman D band was observed after the acid treatment, demonstrating that oxidation had occurred. This is the first step towards developing a real-time technique for dynamic studies of chemical reactions on single nanoparticles/molecules.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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References

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