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Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Polyester/Nanoclay Nanocomposites: Microstructure-Mixing Strategy Correlation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Hamid Dalir
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Research on Polymers and Composites (CREPEC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3A7, CANADA.
Rouhollah D. Farahani
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Research on Polymers and Composites (CREPEC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3A7, CANADA.
Vireya Nhim
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical Engineering, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers (ENSAM), 151 Boulevard Hôpital, Paris 75013, FRANCE.
Benjamin Samson
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics, École Polytechnique de Paris, 32 Boulevard Victor, Paris 75015, FRANCE.
Martin Lévesque
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Research on Polymers and Composites (CREPEC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3A7, CANADA.
Daniel Therriault
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Research on Polymers and Composites (CREPEC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3A7, CANADA.
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Abstract

Different nanoclay mixing strategies using a three-roll mill and ultrasonication is proposed to obtain the desired polyester/nanoclay dispersion, intercalation, and exfoliation. The dispersion states of the modified nanoclay in polymer with 2, 4 and 6 wt% loading were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and low and high magnification transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanical properties of the clay-reinforced polyester nanocomposites were a function of the nature and the content of the clay in the matrix. The nanocomposite containing 4 wt% modified Cloisite® 15A exhibits excellent improvement in modulus (by ~51%) and tensile strength (by ~12%) with a decrease in fracture strain (by ~26%) and fracture energy (by ~17%). These mechanical characteristic changes can be attributed to the dispersion, intercalation, and exfoliation of the nanoclays inside the polyester matrix.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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